Linda Suskie

  A Common Sense Approach to Assessment & Accreditation

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Making a habit of using classroom assessment information to inform our own teaching

Posted on December 20, 2016 at 10:50 AM

Given my passion for assessment, you might not be surprised to learn that, whenever I teach, the most fun part for me is analyzing how my students have done on the tests and assignments I’ve given them. Once tests or papers are graded, I can’t wait to count up how many students got each test question right or how many earned each possible score on each rubric criterion. When I teach workshops, I rely heavily on minute papers, and I can’t wait to type up all the comments and do a qualitative analysis of them. I love to teach, and I really want to be as good a teacher as I can. And, for me, an analysis of what students have and haven’t learned is the best possible feedback on how well I’m teaching, much more meaningful and useful than student evaluations of teaching.

 

I always celebrate the test questions or rubric criteria that all my students did well on. I make a point of telling the class and, no matter how jaded they are, you should see their faces light up!

 

And I always reflect on the test questions or rubric criteria for which my students did poorly. Often I can figure out on my own what happened. Often it’s simply a poorly written question or assignment, but sometimes I have to admit to myself that I didn’t teach that concept or skill particularly well. If I can’t figure out what happened, I ask the class and, trust me, they’re happy to tell me how I screwed up! If it’s a really vital concept or skill and we’re not at the end of the course, I’ll often tell them, “I screwed up, but I can’t let you out of here not knowing how to do this. We’re going to go over it again, you’re going to get more homework on it, and you’ll submit another assignment (or have more test questions) on this.” If it's the end of the course, I make notes to myself on what I'll do differently next time.

 

I often share this story at the faculty workshops I facilitate. I then ask for a show of hands of how many participants do this kind of analysis in their own classes. The number of hands raised varies—sometimes there will be maybe half a dozen hands in a room of 80, sometimes more—but rarely do more than a third or half of those present raise their hands. This is a real issue, because if faculty aren’t in the habit of analyzing and reflecting on assessment results in their own classes, how can we expect them to do so collaboratively on broader learning outcomes? In short, it’s a troubling sign that the institutional community is not yet in the habit of using systematic evidence to understand and improve student learning, which is what all accreditors want.

 

Here, then, is my suggestion for a New Year’s resolution for all of you who teach or in any way help students learn: Start doing this! You don’t have to do this for every assignment in every course you teach, but pick at least one key test or assignment in one course whose scores aren’t where you’d like them. Your analysis and reflection on that one test or assignment will lead you into the habit of using the assessment evidence in front of you more regularly, and it will make you an even better teacher than you are today.

 

Categories: Practical Tips

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Reply JosephFodia
6:47 AM on February 10, 2017 
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